Iman Ebrahimpour

Iman Ebrahimpour (b. 1991, Tehran, Iran) has received his Diploma in Graphic Design from Farabi School of Art in Karaj and his BFA from Kamal-Ol-Molk University of Nowshahr. He earned the first prize of Kamal-Ol-Molk University’s Festival of Visual Arts in 2010, and in 2014, he was one of the acclaimed artists of the Versus Art Contest. Ebrahimpour has held one solo show and his works have been included in several group exhibitions. He lives and works in Karaj.
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When I stand in a flower field stretched before my feet, fading into the distant horizon, the beauty of the flowers unconsciously attracts my attention to the blue sky above that is in fact dark. The hazy band of light seen in the night sky is the Milky Way. Consisting of billions of hot stars and terrifying explosions, it is carrying me, the flowers, and everything else, to an unknown place into darkness, with the speed of two million kilometers per hour. I think in the moment I encounter the field, the horizon, and the sky, all my memories have left behind in a moment of no return, as I am moving away from it by the second. All those events that are formed as a result of similar tiny behaviors, are expanding on an expanse of ninety-three billion light-years (the observable universe) in a way that even billion trillion stars cannot light it. In the meantime, the farthest human-made object from Earth, Voyager-1, has traveled less than 20 million km (almost 18 light-hours). The examples of these two points of view, i.e., below and above the horizon line, convey both senses of beauty and awe that are present in all my observations, in a way that in each encounter with any kind of beauty vis-à-vis its inherent sense of fear and awe, it is destroyed and reconstructed in an eternal cycle. These mysterious phenomena that are colored with sorrow and longing, have always fascinated me. They are mysterious as Da Vinci’s landscapes, sad as Friedreich’s mountains, terrifying and disintegrating like the works of Kiefer. Pondering these things always leaves me with a question: What should be create in such a world? In other words, has anything been created after the Big Bang?

 Iman Ebrahimpour, “Deylaman”, mixed media on canvas, 230 x 200 cm, 2019
Iman Ebrahimpour, “Smelling”, mixed media on paper, 40 x 68 cm, 2019
Iman Ebrahimpour, Untitled, mixed media on canvas, 49 x 79 cm, 2018
Iman Ebrahimpour, Untitled, mixed media on canvas, 41 x 69 cm, 2019
Iman Ebrahimpour, Untitled, mixed media on canvas, 40 x 70 cm, 2019
Iman Ebrahimpour, Untitled, mixed media on canvas, 40 x 50 cm, 2019
Iman Ebrahimpour, Untitled, mixed media on paper, 61 x 49 cm, 2019
Iman Ebrahimpour, Untitled, mixed media on canvas, 40 x 50 cm, 2019