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Dec. 4, 2016

As Ghazel gradually develops her thoughts about questions of roots, belonging or movement, she distances herself from the experiences of her own life and adopts artistic forms of expression evoking collective experiences of travel and mobility on a global scale. The latter encompasses the stories of individuals who face structural violence by state apparatus while crossing borders, forcing them to become what she calls “transparent people”.

The documentation of these unwritten stories, in Ghazel’s work, whether real stories or metaphors of them, shapes the image of our contemporary History.

As a result of collecting these experiences of mobility, a sense of cosmopolitanism emerges in Ghazal’s work and discourse, corresponding to a “transnational culture” but nevertheless grounded in basic elements of identity such as family, class and nation.

 

Amin Moghadam, Phd

 

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