Wooden Grider

Farshido Larimian

We called my grandfather “Agha Joon”. A part of my childhood was in Agha Joon’s house, which he had built himself. Artistic creation can be considered  as a behavior: a reaction to the environment and what is happening around us. The reconstruction and installation of Agha Joon’s house is an emotional and artistic reaction to the sudden disappearance of that house, a part of the artistic identity of the artist. If destroying Agha Joon’s house is an inevitable fact and outcome of the external circumstances, its reconstruction by the artist is also the inevitable outcome of his internal state, his thoughts, and his grief. Nonetheless, the artist who cares about the nostalgia, the past, and the elements of  his artistic evolution cannot be neutral about the current era in wich he lives, his current environment and context of his current inspirations and productions. So the present works focus on two eras, two fields, and in fact, two histories and they are supposed to depict the artist’s attitude toward these histories and the interaction between them.

Wooden Grider No.01, From “All That Is Solid Melts Into Air” Series, 21 x 23 x 14  cm, Edition 1/3 + AP,  2016
Wooden Grider No.02, From “All That Is Solid Melts Into Air” Series, 28 x 30 x 20  cm, Edition 1/3 + AP,  2016
Wooden Grider No.04, From “All That Is Solid Melts Into Air” Series, 62.5 x 24 x 22.5  cm, Edition 1/3 + AP,  2016
Wooden Grider No.03, From “All That Is Solid Melts Into Air” Series, 87 x 26 x 22  cm, Edition 1/3 + AP,  2016
Wooden Grider series | 2016
Wooden Grider series | 2016
Wooden Grider series | 2016
Wooden Grider series | 2016
Wooden Grider series | 2016
Wooden Grider series | 2016